Rolex Chromalight vs Super-LuminNova

Rolex first introduced the Chromalight display on the Deepsea Sea-Dweller in 2008. While it is also a photoluminescent material, this time, instead of green, Rolex’s proprietary compound glows blue in the dark. Moreover, according to Rolex, Chromalight can last up to eight hours, more than twice as long as other luminescent materials. Following the Deepsea, Rolex began equipping other sports watches, such as the Submariner, Daytona and GMT-Master II, with Chromalight instead of Super-LumiNova.
Today, every Rolex sports watch uses Chromalight on its hands and hour markers. In addition, since 2015, most of the classic watches in the brand’s Oyster collection have also been equipped with Chromalight on their hands and hour markers https://seniors-site.com. interestingly, some modern Milgauss watches have included both blue and green luminescence for a very short period of time. With this in mind, the latest Milgauss models are exclusively made with Chromalight.
To create its proprietary Chromalight display, Rolex first uses an ultra-fine metal oxide powder composed of aluminum strontium, dysprosium and europium. Creating this powder requires a complex and delicate manufacturing process to achieve the right balance of materials. The mixture is then heated to form crystals through a reaction that can only occur at controlled high temperatures.
At this point, the luminescent material is in the form of a crystallized powder, and although it will still react to light and glow, its form does not allow it to be applied to the hands and hour markers of a watch.

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